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Article #1

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • fo
  • fo'
  • fur

Etymology[edit]

Middle EnglishOld English(for, on account of, for the sake of, through, because of, owing to, from, by reason of, as to, in order to)Proto-Germanic(for)Proto-Indo-EuropeanWest Frisian(for)Dutch(for)German(for)Danish(for)Swedish(for)Norwegian(for)Icelandic(for)Latin(by, through, for, by means of)Ancient Greek(perífor, about, toward)Lithuanian(by, through, during)Sanskrit(páriover, around)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (stressed) enPR: fôr
  • (UK) IPA(key): /fɔː(ɹ)/
  • (US, Canada) IPA(key): /fɔɹ/
  • (Australia, New Zealand) IPA(key): /foː(ɹ)/
  • Audio (US) (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • (unstressed) enPR: fər
  • (UK, Australia) IPA(key): /fə(ɹ)/
  • (New Zealand) IPA(key): /fɘ(ɹ)/
  • (US, Canada) IPA(key): /fɚ/, IPA(key): /fə/
  • Audio (US), unstressed,
    in the phrase "Wait for me". (file)
  • Homophone: fore, (with "horse-hoarse" merger) Homophone: four

Conjunction[edit]

for

  1. (now uncommon) Because.
  2. 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Chapter 23 "By means of the Golden Cap I shall command the Winged Monkeys to carry you to the gates of the Emerald City," said Glinda, "for it would be a shame to deprive the people of so wonderful a ruler."

Translations[edit]

Preposition[edit]

for

  1. Towards. The astronauts headed for the moon.
  2. Directed at, intended to belong to. I have something for you.
  3. Supporting (opposite of against). All those for the motion raise your hands.
  4. Because of. He wouldn't apologize; and just for that, she refused to help him. (UK usage) He looks better for having lost weight. She was the worse for drink.
  5. Shakespeare with fiery eyes sparkling for very wrath
  6. 1867, Frederick Metcalfe, The Oxonian in Iceland (page 202) "A summerly day for you," said my host; "You ought to be here in winter. It is impossible then to get out of the doors for the snow and wind. Ugh! dreadful weather!"
  7. Over a period of time. I've lived here for three years. They fought for days over a silly pencil.
  8. Garth To guide the sun's bright chariot for a day.
  9. Throughout an extent of space.
  10. Shakespeare For many miles about / There's scarce a bush.
  11. On behalf of. I will stand in for him.
  12. Instead of, or in place of.
  13. Bible, Exodus xxi. 23, 24 And if any mischief follow, then thou shalt give life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot.
  14. In order to obtain or acquire. I am aiming for completion by the end of business Thursday. He's going for his doctorate. Do you want to go for coffee? People all over Greece looked to Delphi for answers. Can you go to the store for some eggs? I'm saving up for a car. Don't wait for an answer. What did he ask you for?
  15. Denham He writes not for money, nor for praise.
  16. In the direction of: marks a point one is going toward. Run for the hills! He was headed for the door when he remembered.
  17. Francis Bacon We sailed from Peru for China and Japan.
  18. By the standards of, usually with the implication of those standards being lower than one might otherwise expect. Fair for its day. She's spry for an old lady.
  19. Despite, in spite of.
  20. 1892 August 6, Charles Dickens, "The Unbidden Guest", in All the Year Round,[1] page 133, Mr. Joseph Blenkinshaw was perhaps not worth quite so much as was reported; but for all that he was a very wealthy man […]
  21. 1968, J. J. Scarisbrick, Henry VIII (page 240) For all his faults, there had been something lofty and great about him - as a judge, as a patron of education, as a builder, as an international figure.
  22. Used to indicate the subject of a to-infinitive. For that to happen now is incredibly unlikely. (=It is incredibly unlikely that that will happen now.) All I want is for you to be happy. (=All I want is that you be happy.)
  23. (chiefly US) Out of; used to indicate a fraction, a ratio In term of base hits, Jones was three for four on the day‎
  24. (cricket) used as part of a score to indicate the number of wickets that have fallen At close of play, England were 305 for 3.‎
  25. Indicating that in the character of or as being which anything is regarded or treated; to be, or as being.
  26. Cowley We take a falling meteor for a star.
  27. John Locke If a man can be fully assured of anything for a truth, without having examined, what is there that he may not embrace for true?
  28. Dryden Most of our ingenious young men take up some cry'd-up English poet for their model.
  29. Philips But let her go for an ungrateful woman.
  30. Used to construe various verbs. See the entry for the phrasal verb.
  31. (obsolete) Indicating that in prevention of which, or through fear of which, anything is done.
  32. Beaumont and Fletcher We'll have a bib, for spoiling of thy doublet.

Antonyms[edit]

  • against

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Statistics[edit]

References[edit]

  • Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans, "Spatial particles of orientation", in The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning and Cognition, Cambridge University Press, 2003, 0-521-81430 8

Anagrams[edit]

  • fro, 'fro, ORF

Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

formfors

  1. prize, worth
  2. forum

Cornish[edit]

Noun[edit]

for

  1. Mixed mutation of mor.

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old NorseMiddle Low German(linen, sheath)Proto-Germanic(sheath)

Alternative forms[edit]

  • fór

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /foːr/, [foːˀɐ̯]
  • Rhymes: -oːɐ̯

Noun[edit]

fornforetfor

  1. lining (covering for the inside of something)
  2. lining (material used for inside covering)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɔ/, [fʌ]

Adverb[edit]

for

  1. too (more than enough; as too much)
  2. in front
  3. forward

Conjunction[edit]

for

  1. for, because

Preposition[edit]

for

  1. for
  2. of
  3. to
  4. on
  5. at
  6. before, in front of
  7. by

Etymology 3[edit]

(to rush, run)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /foːr/, [foːˀɐ̯]

Verb[edit]

for, fór or farede

  1. past tense of fare.

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin(outside)

Adverb[edit]

for

  1. away, far, gone
  2. 1998, Henrik Ibsen, trans. Odd Tangerud Puphejmo : Dramo en tri aktoj, [2] NORA (komencas elpreni el la skatolo, sed baldaŭ forĵetas ĉion). Ho, se mi kuraĝus eliri. Se nur neniu venus. Se nur ne dume okazus io hejme. Stulta babilaĵo; neniu venos. Nur ne pensi. Brosi la mufon. Delikataj gantoj, delikataj gantoj. For el la pensoj! For, for! Unu, du, tri, kvar, kvin, ses — (krias) Jen, tie ili venas — NORA (begins to unpack the box, but soon pushes it all away). Oh, if I dared go out. If only no one would come. If only I could be sure nothing would happen here in the meantime. Stupid nonsense; no one will come. Only I mustn't think about it. I will brush my muff. What lovely, lovely gloves. Out of my thoughts, Away, away! One, two, three, four, five, six— (Screams) There, someone's coming—

Derived terms[edit]

Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(to go)

Verb[edit]

for

  1. first-person singular future subjunctive of ir
  2. third-person singular future subjunctive of ir

Etymology 2[edit]

(to be)

Verb[edit]

for

  1. first-person singular future subjunctive of ser
  2. third-person singular future subjunctive of ser

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɔːr/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːr

Noun[edit]

forfforarforir

  1. mud
  2. bog

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • forarpittur

Ido[edit]

Preposition[edit]

for

  1. far from

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Proto-ItalicProto-Indo-European(to speak)(news; fame)(story, tale, fable)(phēmíspeak)(phátisrumour, news, speech)(phásisspeech, announcement)(phōnḗvoice)(bajatitell, narrate)(basnĭfable)(bájatʹ)(básnja)(bhánatispeak)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /for/, [fɔr]

Verb[edit]

forfārīfātus sum

  1. I speak, talk, say.

Inflection[edit]

   Conjugation of for (first conjugation, deponent)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present for fāris, fāre fātur fāmur fāminī fantur
imperfect fābar fābāris, fābāre fābātur fābāmur fābāminī fābantur
future fābor fāberis, fābere fābitur fābimur fābiminī fābuntur
perfect fātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect fātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect fātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present fer fēris, fēre fētur fēmur fēminī fentur
imperfect fārer fārēris, fārēre fārētur fārēmur fārēminī fārentur
perfect fātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect fātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present fāre fāminī
future fātor fātor fantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives fārī, fārier1 fātus esse fātūrus esse
participles fāns fātus fātūrus fandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
fārī, fārier1 fandī fandō fandum fātum fātū

Synonyms[edit]

  • (say): dīcō, loquor, āiō

Derived terms[edit]

  • affor
  • effor
  • fandus
  • fāns
  • fātum
  • infandus
  • īnfāns
  • interfor

Related terms[edit]

  • affābilis
  • effābilis
  • fābulor
  • fācundus
  • fācundia
  • fāma
  • fās
  • fastus
  • nefandus
  • nefāriē
  • nefās
  • nefāstus

References[edit]

  • for in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • for in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • FOR in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • good Latin: sermo latinus (opp. sermo parum latinus) (cf. sect. VII. 2., note For the use of adverbs...)
  • thought and deed: consilia et facta (cf. sect. X. 1, note For 'thoughts and deeds'...)
  • (ambiguous) to translate freely: his fere verbis, hoc fere modo convertere, transferre
  • (ambiguous) synonyms: vocabula idem fere declarantia
  • (ambiguous) to talk of a subject which was then the common topic of conversation: in eum sermonem incidere, qui tum fere multis erat in ore
  • (ambiguous) as usually happens: ut fit, ita ut fit, ut fere fit
  • (ambiguous) he spoke (very much) as follows: haec (fere) dixit
  • (ambiguous) this is very much what Cicero said: haec Ciceronis fere

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɔrː/ (unstressed)
  • IPA(key): /fɔ/ (unstressed)
  • Audio (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

Adverb[edit]

for

  1. too for ung‎ ― too young for langt‎ ― too far
Synonyms[edit]
  • altfor

Etymology 2[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

for

  1. for
Synonyms[edit]
  • fordi

Etymology 3[edit]

Old Norse

Noun[edit]

fornforetforforaforene

  1. alternative form of fôr
Derived terms[edit]
  • dyrefor
  • fiskefor

Etymology 4[edit]

Preposition[edit]

for

  1. for

Etymology 5[edit]

Verb[edit]

for

  1. past tense of fare.

References[edit]

  • “for” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Audio (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

for

  1. for
Synonyms[edit]
  • fordi

Etymology 2[edit]

Old Norse

Noun[edit]

fornforetforfora

  1. alternative form of fôr
Derived terms[edit]
  • dyrefor
  • fiskefor

Etymology 3[edit]

Preposition[edit]

for

  1. for

References[edit]

  • “for” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Novial[edit]

Adjective[edit]

for

  1. away

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Proto-Germanic

Preposition[edit]

for

  1. for

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

fōr

  1. first-person singular preterite of faran
  2. third-person singular preterite of faran

Noun[edit]

fōrf

  1. journey, going, course, expedition, approach; passage, lifestyle, way of life
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Old English

Noun[edit]

fōrm

  1. hog, pig
Declension[edit]

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • far

Etymology[edit]

Proto-Celtic(you (pl.))Latin

Determiner[edit]

for

  1. your (plural)
  2. you (plural; as the object of a preposition that takes the genitive)
  3. c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 16d8 Bíuu-sa oc irbáig dar far cenn-si fri Maccidóndu. I am boasting about you to the Macedonians.

Synonyms[edit]

  • sethar

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: bhur
  • Scottish Gaelic: ur

Old Saxon[edit]

Noun[edit]

for

  1. Alternative form of fora

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈfoɾ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfoʁ/

Verb[edit]

for

  1. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of ir
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of ir Quando for, me avise. When she goes, let me know.
  3. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of ser
  4. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of ser Enquanto ela for viva, merece todo o nosso respeito. As long as she is alive, she deserves all our respect.

Etymology 2[edit]

English

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfɔʁ/, /ˈfɔɹ/

Noun[edit]

formfors

  1. (programming) for (a loop that uses a counter)

Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

for

  1. past tense of fara.

Walloon[edit]

Noun[edit]

formfors

  1. oven

Source: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/for



Article #2

Loop constructs
Do-while loop
While loop
For loop
For-each loop
Infinite loop
Control flow

for-loopfor loop

für

do-loop

This section duplicates the scope of other sections, specifically, Control_flow#Loops. (May 2016)
It has been suggested that this article be merged with Control_flow#Loops. (Discuss) Proposed since May 2016.

Kinds of for-loops[edit]

Traditional for-loops[edit]

The initialization declares (and perhaps assigns to) any variables required. The type of a variable should be same if you are using multiple variables in initialization part. The condition checks a condition, and quits the loop if false. The afterthought is performed exactly once every time the loop ends and then repeats.

Iterator-based for-loops[edit]

Vectorised for-loops[edit]

The difference may be significant.

But whether that would be rendered in the style of the for-loop or the for all-loop or something else may not be clearly described in the compiler manual.

Compound for-loops[edit]

truefalse

Loop counter[edit]

loop counter

ijkijijiijjkk

Example[edit]

ij

Additional semantics and constructs[edit]

Use as infinite loops[edit]

Early exit and continuation[edit]

Some languages offer further facilities such as naming the various loop statements, so that with multiple nested loops there is no doubt as to which loop is involved. Fortran 95, for example:

Loop variable scope and semantics[edit]

Adjustment of bounds[edit]

Just as the index variable might be modified within a for-loop, so also may its bounds and direction. But to uncertain effect. A compiler may prevent such attempts, they may have no effect, or they might even work properly - though many would declare that to do so would be wrong. Consider a statement such as

List of value ranges[edit]

PL/I and Algol 68, allows loops in which the loop variable is iterated over a list of ranges of values instead of a single range. The following PL/I example will execute the loop with six values of i: 1, 7, 12, 13, 14, 15:

Equivalence with while-loops[edit]

is easily translated into the following while-loop:

This translation is slightly complicated by languages which allow a statement to jump to the next iteration of the loop (such as the "continue" statement in C). These statements will typically implicitly increment the counter of a for-loop, but not the equivalent while-loop (since in the latter case the counter is not an integral part of the loop construct). Any translation will have to place all such statements within a block that increments the explicit counter before running the statement.

In practice[edit]

Timeline of the for-loop syntax in various programming languages[edit]

Given an action that must be repeated, for instance, five times, different languages' for-loops will be written differently. The syntax for a three-expression for-loop is nearly identical in all languages that have it, after accounting for different styles of block termination and so on.

1957: FORTRAN[edit]

The following two examples behave equivalently to the three argument for-loop in other languages, initializing the counter variable to 1, incrementing by 1 each iteration of the loop and stopping at five (inclusive).

In Fortran 77 (or later), this may also be written as:

The step part may be omitted if the step is one. Example:

1958: Algol[edit]

1960: COBOL[edit]

If the PERFORM verb has the optional clause TEST AFTER, the resulting loop is slightly different: the loop body is executed at least once, before any test.

1964: BASIC[edit]

Notice that the end-loop marker specifies the name of the index variable, which must correspond to the name of the index variable in the start of the for-loop. Some languages (PL/I, FORTRAN 95 and later) allow a statement label on the start of a for-loop that can be matched by the compiler against the same text on the corresponding end-loop statement. Fortran also allows the EXIT and CYCLE statements to name this text; in a nest of loops this makes clear which loop is intended. However, in these languages the labels must be unique, so successive loops involving the same index variable cannot use the same text nor can a label be the same as the name of a variable, such as the index variable for the loop.

1964: PL/I[edit]

1968: Algol 68[edit]

Further, the single iteration range could be replaced by a list of such ranges. There are several unusual aspects of the construct

  • only the do ~ od portion was compulsory, in which case the loop will iterate indefinitely.
  • thus the clause to 100 do ~ od, will iterate exactly 100 times.
  • the while syntactic element allowed a programmer to break from a for loop early, as in:

1970: Pascal[edit]

The numeric-range for-loop varies somewhat more.

1972: C/C++[edit]

1972: Smalltalk[edit]

1980: Ada[edit]

1980: Maple[edit]

Maple has two forms of for-loop, one for iterating of a range of values, and the other for iterating over the contents of a container. The value range form is as follows:

Iterating over a container is done using this form of loop:

1982: Maxima CAS[edit]

1982: PostScript[edit]

1983: Ada 83 and above[edit]

1984: MATLAB[edit]

1987: Perl[edit]

1988: Mathematica[edit]

The construct corresponding to most other languages' for-loop is called Do in Mathematica

Mathematica also has a For construct that mimics the for-loop of C-like languages

1989: Bash[edit]

1990: Haskell[edit]

or get each iteration result as a list in

and used as:

1991: Oberon-2, Oberon-07, or Component Pascal[edit]

Note that in the original Oberon language the for-loop was omitted in favor of the more general Oberon loop construct. The for-loop was reintroduced in Oberon-2.

1991: Python[edit]

1993: AppleScript[edit]

You can also iterate through a list of items, similar to what you can do with arrays in other languages:

1993: Lua[edit]

So, this code

will print:

For-loops can also loop through a table using

to iterate numerically through arrays and

to iterate randomly through dictionaries.

1995: CFML[edit]

Script syntax[edit]

Simple index loop:

Using an array:

Using a list of string values:

Tag syntax[edit]

Simple index loop:

Using an array:

Using a "list" of string values:

1995: Java[edit]

1995: JavaScript[edit]

Alternatively, it is possible to iterate over all keys of an array.

1995: PHP[edit]

1995: Ruby[edit]

1996: OCaml[edit]

1998: ActionScript 3[edit]

Implementation in interpreted programming languages[edit]

See also[edit]

  • Do while loop
  • Foreach
  • Loop counter
  • While loop

References[edit]

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/For_loop



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